Category Archives: Healthcare

Non profit e fundraiser

What are the Best Nonprofit e-Fundraising Strategies?

Online giving is steadily on the rise, especially since the emergence of the pandemic, and it has accounted for 22% of all online fundraising revenue for 2021, according to M+R Benchmarks. This presents a huge opportunity, especially for the smaller nonprofits that might not have access to large annual donors.

Don’t get me wrong, traditional social events and campaigns are not going anywhere but with the modern world we live in and easy access to the internet, e-fundraising strategies will create opportunities to reach a larger audience, attract a new audience and donors, integrate new campaigns and stewardship techniques, and build stronger relationships with current donors while also reducing the overall cost of the fundraising “event” allowing for more dollars received to go towards and impact the cause.

There’s no denying the fact that e-fundraising has, without a doubt, changed the nonprofit donation landscape and what organizations can do, but because there are so many different types of applications to start a digital nonprofit fundraiser, how do you know which ones to use for your nonprofit?

Well, there’s certainly no one-size-fits-all strategy, but in order to determine which strategies will work best for your nonprofit, you’ll need to have a clear understanding of the different e-fundraising strategies available to you. Below you’ll find a few of the more popular strategies.

Host a Virtual Gaming Tournament

If there’s one thing about a virtual gaming tournament that will make it successful, it’s that gaming is an industry that already has a loyal audience dedicated to playing video games.

You’ll definitely want to do your research on the best games to host for this event, simply because a game that’s popular right now, may not be in seven months at the time of your virtual gaming tournament.

Once you’ve decided on a game, you want to get set up on a streaming service to promote your event. The donations come in by setting a dollar amount for an entry fee for players.

Additionally, you can encourage the viewers watching the competitors play to donate as a way to show support for their favorite players. If you’re going to have 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners, reach out to your local business and see about donations for the winning participants. Trophies or medals work great as well!

Create a Donation Form or Page for Your Nonprofit’s Website

A donation form or page isn’t necessarily a fundraiser in the traditional aspect, however, it’s a convenient and effortless way for people to make donations for all virtual fundraising events you may have.

Whatever virtual event you have, incorporating a simple link or button that redirects the online user to the donation form or page will streamline the donation process without donors having to click around to find out how to make a donation.

Host an Online Auction

Charity auctions aren’t a new event or concept but hosting virtual auctions does bring about a new flare of ease and convenience of the process. With an online auction, you don’t need to book a physical location for the event; a simple picture of the item or listing of the service can be uploaded to your bidding platform. Just be sure to find sponsors, write clear and concise prize descriptions, and properly promote the event via social media, email campaigns, and through local media.

Once the auction is over, you want to get in contact with the winners and discuss payment options as well as delivery options for the prizes. And, of course, thank them for participating in the auction and making their nonprofit donation to your organization.

Getting Your Nonprofit Out There

When it comes to getting donors and reaching new audiences, you have to get your name out there, because if people don’t know who you are and what your nonprofit represents or its mission and vision, your odds of acquiring donations are going to be lower. This particular aspect is how e-fundraising strategies make the biggest impact and difference for nonprofits. There are a lot of free and/or low cost options to help get your nonprofit and its mission out there. One free resource to help get your nonprofit out there is the FREE Google ads campaign they offer to nonprofits. Never heard of this? We are happy to provide you with information about this service. There are also events like “The Big Payback” that your nonprofit can participate in as well as the Amazon giveback program.

There are also local initiatives in your area that provide free platforms for your nonprofit to register for that brings donors and recipients together, providing a greater reach.

At KM Clark, we work to help your nonprofit grow and thrive by implementing strategies to do just that. Though we don’t provide funding, we do provide resources. Contact us today for a free discovery call and let’s see how we can help you!

We offer four primary services:

1. Management and Strategy

2. Media and Marketing

3. Partnership Building

4. Training and Facilitation

Depending on where you are with your nonprofit, you may need one or potentially all of these services to truly take your organization to the next level, and that’s what we’re here to help with.

We understand it can be frustrating when you have great work to do for your community but are struggling to reach enough people to make the difference you know you can make. Don’t get discouraged. We are only a click away!

Contact KM Clark Consulting today to jumpstart your nonprofit and make the difference your community needs.

 

Public speaking

Best Tips on Public Speaking for Beginners

It might be fair to admit we all probably share a few common fears like flying, heights, or fear of the dark. Avoidance can be an easy solution to our fears. If we’re afraid of flying, then we are likely to drive instead of buying a ticket for an airplane or if we’re afraid of heights then taking up mountain climbing may not be our top choice of activities.

But what if avoidance isn’t an option because your fear is an activity included in your job responsibilities? Yep, we’re talking about the fear of public speaking or the more scientific term “glossophobia”. For some of us, the mere mention of this responsibility can make hearts race and palms sweat.

Public speaking can instill fear in all of us, even the most seasoned speakers. Nonprofit consulting services are a great resource to help clients through these sometimes uncomfortable situations. There are some tips and tricks to employ, though, that can ease you through these daunting events and guide you toward becoming a public speaker exhibiting knowledge and grace. And a much slower heart rate.

Preparation is Key

Public speaking comes in many forms. A best man’s toast, speaking with the media, or thanking a large group of people. Sometimes you have to make an extensive presentation or you’re doing an interview for your local radio station.

Each can contribute to the level of fear you experience, but the common denominator is preparation. You simply have to know what you are going to say. Lack of preparation will only contribute to the anxiety you are already feeling.

Now that you have prepared what you are going to say or present, remember to cut yourself some slack. We all make mistakes and most people observing will sympathize with you should this happen. That being said, it will definitely show if you are underprepared as well.

Remember that old joke “Pardon me, can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?” The answer is: Practice. Practice. Practice. The same applies to public speaking. It is essential that you practice what you intend to say so that you can establish your cadence, pronunciations, and inflections. Know your subject, know your audience and in time practicing will help you leave out the “you knows” and the “ums”. The more you practice, the more you will feel at ease with each word.

The Importance of Appearance

If you are on stage delivering an important speech the last thing you want to think about is your tie being too tight, or your wool sweater too scratchy. Your physical comfort will contribute to feeling relaxed so you can concentrate on your presentation rather than loosening your tie. Preparation includes more than just practicing your speech.

Pay close attention to what you are wearing and the tools around you. Before taking the stage, if you have the ability, move your shoulders up and down and jiggle your arms and hands. A few slow deep breaths can work wonders to alleviate your nerves as well.

Once you begin your presentation don’t be afraid to use your body language. If you appear stiff and immoveable then the audience will notice this rather than concentrate on your speech. Casual hand gesturing and even walking around, if the situation allows, can contribute to your connection with the audience as well.

And lastly, make eye contact. It doesn’t matter if it’s an audience of five or 500, there is no surer way to connect with people than by making eye contact. This creates an intimate, human connection and can convince an audience of the significance of your words.

Are You Still Nervous?

If you are, then let that be the driving force to help you prepare what you have to say in front of an audience. Fear and anxiety about public speaking are normal and can affect anyone, but by implementing the tips above and of course, practicing, you’ll be sure to become more and more proficient at it. If you’re looking for more assistance on public speaking, reach out to us at KM Clark Consulting. We have years of experience with public speaking and… actually enjoy it! Let us help you find a place where you can enjoy public speaking as well!

Ways to Retain Nonprofit Board Members

Ways to Retain Nonprofit Board Members

Most nonprofit organizations will tell you that a motivated and compassionate team is what drives the day-to-day function of their organization. Key areas like administration, program coordinators, and direct service specialists are the heart and soul of what makes a nonprofit successful in addressing client needs and building a solid reputation as skilled providers in the community.

But where does leadership fall in this combination of expertise and connection to stakeholders?When contemplating your next steps in broadening awareness and projecting services to the next level, nonprofit consulting firms will tell you the strategy begins with the formation of a strong, sustainable board of directors.

A team of board members who are engaged with their community as well as in their industries,coupled with the desire to improve the lives of those served by a specific nonprofit, are an integral component of successful, long-term planning for growth.

But once you have these leaders on board, how do you keep their interest? How do you leverage their influence to drive an organization’s plan for maintaining services to those individuals who have the most need?

Where To Begin

The first piece of ordinary, yet effective advice a nonprofit consultant will tell you is to
run efficient, informative meetings. Board members by nature are busy people. In addition to their careers, they are involved in professional and philanthropic efforts and need time for their families and personal interests as well. Their time is a precious commodity and they cannot afford to waste it attending a 3-hour meeting that should have been an hour.

Ensure that agendas are created and disseminated to board members prior to meetings. Any questions that board members have about the agenda should be received prior to the meeting so that it can be properly addressed during the meeting without losing time and getting off track at the meeting. Don’t repeat in a meeting what has already been read in an email or report. Use this time for active discussions that propel the goals and tasks within the agenda.

And this might seem obvious, but since board meetings often occur around mealtimes it is always a welcome courtesy to provide refreshments. You don’t want your board members thinking about dinner when you want them to engage with the work at hand. It’s another way to show you care about them, their time and want to provide them with something in return.

Do They Know Your Story?

The stronger and more personal their connection is to your mission and vision the more likely board members will want to stay around to celebrate successful results. Since your staff members, especially those in direct service, intimately know your programs and gaps that may exist, they are an enormous resource to convey the impact of your nonprofit in the community. Enlist staff members to give presentations about programs and the people who are helped. Don’t be afraid to tug at their heartstrings. Remind board members why they are there and what they can do to keep the mission alive. Share success stories, but also describe areas where needs are not being met and what marginalized populations might be falling through the cracks.

Have They Experienced Your Work First-Hand?

It is one thing to hear reports about those vulnerable people who are helped or community
issues that are addressed, but it is another thing entirely for board members to join in on the work your organization does every day.

Invite board members to “shadow” staff members who are out in the community providing
direct services. We all know that people suffer from hunger, but that hunger looks different when serving food in a homeless shelter. We also know that there are folks who don’t possess the skills to land meaningful jobs that support their families. Board members can observe staff members providing employment skills to refugees and immigrants, the recently incarcerated, and people with physical or mental disabilities.

The more board members see, the more they are able to be an advocate for your organization in the community.

Don’t Forget the All-Important Thank You

Your board members aren’t volunteering for your organization because they expect a thank you or want any praise, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t give it to them when appropriate. And it doesn’t have to be grand or cost you much money. A nicely written thank you card goes a long way! But your appreciation can also be shown by providing small gifts, appreciation luncheons or even shout outs at events. By providing an environment where their endeavors impact their philanthropic passion, your nonprofit will enjoy the benefits of a board with staying power.

They will firmly connect with your work and enjoy being part of the solution that improves the quality of life in all of our communities. If you’re concerned about the best ways for your nonprofit organization to retain valuable board members, reach out to KM Clark Consulting for help. We know how important your board members are to you and we want to see them stick around for the long haul. Let us help you create a plan to make that happen. Contact us today to get started!

A Vital Nonprofit Resource: How to Grow and Manage Your Volunteer Base

A Vital Nonprofit Resource: How to Grow and Manage Your Volunteer Base

Within a nonprofit organization there is typically a long list of responsibilities with not as long a list of employees to cover these needs. Therefore, employees typically end up wearing multiple hats. The grants administrator might also be teaching job skills trainings and a project manager might also be working as an event coordinator for a fundraising event. Hours can be long and employees can be stretched thin at times.

For these reasons, and more, are why a volunteer base is critical to ensuring that the community’s needs are met and employees aren’t reaching burnout. Community members have an enormous wealth of skills, experience, and compassion that can be utilized to accomplish any number of tasks or goals critical to the overall function of a nonprofit organization. But how do we get them to volunteer with our organization?

Who Are They and Where Do You Find Them?

The simple answer is anyone. The more specific answer is family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, church members, etc. Most people can be a volunteer. They just have to be asked. So many people are unaware of the needs that most nonprofits have that they might not realize they have a lot to offer other than a monetary donation.

Word of mouth can move mountains in the nonprofit world. Recruit through your contacts, your staff members, and through current volunteers. Encourage everyone to spread the word about volunteer opportunities. Asking for help can be humbling on any level, but when the request benefits a community issue, particularly when aiding vulnerable or marginalized people, the reward of gaining committed volunteers is worth the effort.

Also, make the recruitment of volunteers as part of your marketing strategy. People who devote their time to your organization are a key component to building brand awareness as well the more tangible aspect of getting the work done. Utilizing social media and volunteer websites to recruit volunteers will help disseminate appeals to grow a larger volunteer base with varied skills and time commitments.

Best Practices for Managing Volunteers

Don’t let your volunteer recruitment success falter by not having a plan in place that provides training and designated task assignments. If feasible, hire a volunteer coordinator to handle all aspects of the volunteer component of your nonprofit. This staff member should be fluent regarding all programs and the unmet needs within each and be skilled in filling the gaps with a diverse group of volunteers. A volunteer coordinator should:

  • Offer a variety of volunteer assignments and post each online with detailed descriptions.
  • Try to match volunteers according to their skill sets and their personal requests.
  • Provide training about the mission of the organization as well as for instructions for each task.
  • Communicate expectations and provide a safe environment for questions or problems.
  • Encourage both temporary and long-term needs and assignments.

 

If it’s unfeasible to hire a volunteer coordinator – your nonprofit organization can still make this work. Reach out to KM Clark Consulting Group today to see how we can help find unique ways to fit this into your organization’s structure. We know you’re busy and in the long run, a robust volunteer base will help lessen the work of employees.

How to Say Thank You

Volunteers choose to embrace sometimes difficult and often thankless types of tasks for as many reasons as there are different types of assignments. They choose to devote their precious time to lending their skills as well as their muscle to help nonprofit organizations succeed in their mission.

Volunteers deserve appreciation and recognition just as much as the exemplary employees on your staff. While they are lending their time to share in the responsibilities that make a nonprofit function it is necessary to reward their efforts. Ways to say thank you can include:

  • Feature volunteers in digital marketing platforms like newsletters and on social media.
  • During organization events highlight the contributions made by volunteers and the difference their work makes.
  • Thank volunteers with personalized messages from staff members or the executive director.
  • Share the story of a community member who has been directly helped by the work of a volunteer or group of volunteers.
  • Ask community members to write personal messages to volunteers showing their appreciation.
  • Hold a volunteer recognition event and invite donors as well as community members to share in thanking all of the organization’s volunteers.

 

Now’s the Time!

The best time to start growing your volunteer base is now. Even if you start small, the key is to just start. A strong, diverse volunteer base is an integral part of a nonprofit success. If you’re still unsure where to begin, KM Clark Consulting would love to assist your team in taking those first steps. Reach out to us today to see how we can help.

Compassion Fatigue How to Care for Your Staff

Compassion Fatigue: How to Care for Your Staff

People that are driven to work for nonprofit organizations are often compelled by an intense sense of compassion for vulnerable, often marginalized people and by societal issues that demand advocacy and action.

The responsibilities that these employees take on can be difficult and time-consuming as well as often exhausting and heart-breaking. Nonprofits often exist because there are significant gaps in our society’s systems. If these needs did not occur then these agencies would not have a reason to open their doors and employ those called to serve.

But the needs are there, and fortunately, there are a myriad of nonprofit organizations that address a seemingly endless supply of issues for people and the communities in which they live. And thankfully, there are nonprofit employees who devote their skills and generous hearts to these causes, but sometimes at a cost to their own well-being.

Addressing compassion fatigue is a critical component that nonprofit leadership must maintain at the forefront of caring for staff. The well-being of each employee, from an organizational standpoint, can reflect the success of services provided by a nonprofit. From a human standpoint, it is simply the right thing to do, especially when many employees are providing direct services to often the most vulnerable clients.

Stress Management and Self-Care

Take a good hard look at what your employees face every day. They are aiding people and communities who are often suffering from illness, homelessness, or a variety of traumas. The hopelessness and despair that often accompany these issues can infiltrate staff members’ lives and manifest in both physical and mental health issues.

Decision-makers, in combination with nonprofit consulting firms, should create a strategy that cares for their employees as deliberately as they care for their needy clients. A safe and compassionate work environment is the best place to start treating staff with the same thoughtfulness they give to the community every day.

Sometimes the simplest measures can produce the most beneficial results. Allow employees the opportunity to decompress after particularly stressful or traumatic situations. Staff members often cannot solve their clients’ problems, and this can contribute to a sense of failure or feeling hopeless. Time away from the office to rest and re-energize can alleviate the impact of weighty job responsibilities as well. Remind staff to take vacation days and to not resort to overtime.

No one employed at a nonprofit organization can function in a silo. Collaboration is vital in both their own workplace and with partner agencies. Nonprofit leadership should encourage personal connections both internally and externally so that employees have peers who understand the work conditions as well as offer advice to cope.

It is important to encourage staff members to have some fun. Allow for some planned events like potluck lunches or seasonal get-togethers. Share success stories and highlight employees who have made meaningful contributions to your mission. And never forget that even the smallest recognition of an employee’s value can contribute to building positive feelings.

The Role of Professional Help

While all of these efforts offer benefits, sometimes it becomes necessary to harness the mental health expertise of professionals. Don’t think of this as a last resort. Instead, think of this as enlisting counselors as an added component of self-care and a part of the organization’s commitment to staff mental health. We realize that this will not always be a necessary or reasonable avenue for some nonprofit, but it is important to know your options.

Make sure that all employees receive training about mental health literacy and how to identify the signs of compassion fatigue. They will often realize that irritability and loss of sleep are manifestations of difficult workplace circumstances as well as recurring feelings of despair and lack of focus.

Whether through one-on-one conversations or in group meetings, mental health therapists can help employees learn how compassion fatigue may be affecting them and how to navigate this sometimes-vicarious trauma so they can maintain optimum well-being.

Nonprofit employees, especially those who provide direct services to highly vulnerable people and societal issues, risk their own mental health while caring for others. It is not only professionally essential but ethically critical to care for employees with the same heartfelt compassion as those who strive to make the world a better place for all.

We would love to share more examples of low-cost self-care options you can provide your employees with. Contact KM Clark Consulting today to set up a free discovery session with us!

Interns as Potential Employees: Partnering With Local Colleges & Universities

Interns as Potential Employees: Partnering with Local Colleges & Universities

The engine that drives any business, whether in the private sector or the nonprofit world, is a diverse staff with a range of talents and expertise. Any nonprofit consulting firm will advise that maintaining veteran employees while injecting a fresh perspective with newer employees is critical in keeping that engine a well-oiled machine.

One important way that organizations can balance the depth of employees is to create an internship program that boosts staff numbers in the short term but also has the potential to create long-term employees. Forming partnerships with local as well as regional colleges and universities is the perfect place to start.

Define Your Needs

Analyze your programs and determine where gaps exist. An intern could potentially fill those gaps to enable programs to function at full capacity. Nonprofit organizations have an enormous breadth of departments and programs that would be conducive to aligning interns with areas that need attention that staff members can’t create or complete.

Simple observations aren’t enough. Your numbers will tell a more comprehensive story. Are you falling short of fundraising goals? Maybe an intern in your development and marketing departments could provide an added benefit to securing more dollars. Are clients missing out on direct services because there just aren’t enough employees to provide assistance to those who need it? Project-specific interns can assist seasoned program specialists, ensuring that no one falls through the cracks.

And always ask your staff what they need. They are often spread too thin and know where problem areas could benefit from an extra hands on deck.

Win-Win Partnerships

Colleges and universities in your area can provide a wealth of potential intern candidates that match your organization’s needs for augmenting services as well as adding to the depth of expertise on staff.

Students and faculty often look for internship opportunities for specific fields and programs. Depending on the school, look for campus departments like career centers whose purpose is to match students with local businesses and nonprofit organizations in order to fill academic requirements.

It may also be helpful to contact college deans, department chairs, or professors to discuss what you have available or what can possibly be created to not only fill gaps in staff and programs but to also provide a rich, experiential opportunity.

Make sure you convey the benefits of establishing this partnership. Students will gain real-world workplace experience in their fields and will be actively contributing to helping their community. Colleges and universities will improve their position in the community by aligning with nonprofit organizations whose missions are defined by giving back to improve people’s lives. And they improve their track record of turning students into employed graduates.

Thinking Outside the Internship Box

Contemplate the areas of study with which to identify potential interns in. The field of social work is an obvious place to start because many graduates will gravitate to direct services provided by many nonprofits. But there are also other academic majors to consider as possibilities in establishing an internship program.

• Communications: College students are tech-savvy when it comes to online platforms. A communications major intern could help to build your online presence across multiple social media platforms or help with other traditional media like writing press releases.

Advertising and Marketing: Interns from these fields can bring cutting-edge knowledge about building your brand and conveying the purpose of your mission across a variety of media channels.

• Computer Science: Your team has had ideas for a database that links programs or a system that tracks numbers for grants compliance, but the expense has prevented this from going beyond a dream. Interns with software creation skills could help maximize efficiency with their ability to design programs and applications.

Many in nonprofit leadership seek advice from experts in nonprofit consulting about how to conserve or stretch funding while remaining a viable source of assistance in their community. Whether your nonprofit is looking to fill in gaps for the long term or short, we believe that internships can be a great way to help with that, while also providing the often-needed experience that new grads need when finishing up school. For help navigating the internship space, or to learn about other cost sharing employment strategies, contact KM Clark Consulting.

Best Practices for Talking to the Media About Your Nonprofit Organization

Best Practices for Talking to the Media about Your Nonprofit Organization

How many times have you encountered the unfortunate fact that too many people don’t know you exist as a nonprofit organization working hard in your local community? You certainly know your story… the purpose of your mission, the population you serve, and your positive impact on the community. Your nonprofit lives and breathes every accomplishment, and just needs a little boost when it comes to disseminating information that can increase awareness to the general public.

In this era of rapid-fire information combined with a tech-savvy audience, you should be provided with all you need to convey your message in the communities you serve. Whether you serve a large community or small, connecting with the outlets capable of broadening your reach is paramount. Have you ever heard “out of sight out of mind” or “the squeaky wheel gets the oil”? There are a number of “phrases” we could throw out here but I think you get the idea. If you are not focusing any time and/or resources on reaching your audience then you are leaving opportunities on the table, and I assure you someone else will be there to pick them up. Not only can the media help your nonprofit reach funders, but it can also help funders feel like their dollars spent are getting the recognition they want to show the community their commitment to helping the cause.

We know this can be overwhelming, so keep reading to hear our best tips on making it simpler. If you’re looking for more, contact us for a FREE discovery call to see how we can help your nonprofit reach its media goals.

First Steps

Before you try to create relationships with local media you must know who they are. You have to identify the television and radio stations in your area as well as newspapers and other print media like magazines. Watch their news coverage and read their articles. Determine what stories they cover. Are they quick to report on local stories concerning nonprofits and their impact? Are there issues they cover that could align with your services?

The advent of online media supplies an additional layer of potential media channels capable of reporting on the programs you administer and the vulnerable people you help. These nontraditional media resources are often smaller in scope and may be more accessible to engage. Ensure building connections by following outlets on all of their social media platforms and making attempts to connect by posting comments.

Make a Personal Connection

Reporters and other members of media staff are busy serving their community, as are you, so don’t get discouraged if you don’t hear back right away. Persistence will prevail! First things first, identify your organization and the purpose of your call. Be sure to ask how you can best provide them with what they look for in a story. Maybe a human-interest story? This can help facilitate the start of a relationship. Consistent communication including press releases can help validate your role in the nonprofit community.

Ensure that you are accessible to reporters and their media organizations and can be easily contacted for stories, statements, or follow-ups. The easier you make potential communication and the more significant the content, you will have a substantially elevated personal as well as professional presence with the media in your area- both traditional and nontraditional.

Your Time to Shine!

This is your time to shine an informative, appealing spotlight on your nonprofit. But your preparation has only just begun. The media windows are small and can close rapidly therefore it is crucial that you have your message distilled with essential details to gain the most impact.

You must master the most important points you want to convey and be prepared to repeat them in order to drive home the message. Practice stating each idea plus a few bonus points to color the overall interest of the interview. Try to shake off any jitters by speaking slowly, loudly, and enunciating clearly. Your time is finite so don’t lose your thread because of the fear of public speaking or other distractions.

And do not forget to state your ask. What do you need? More funding? Donated items? Volunteers? Ask with clarity and purpose because those few seconds might be your only chance at media coverage.

Forming relationships with your local media may seem daunting at first, but your nonprofit organization can reap the rewards of community awareness by cultivating long-term, mutually beneficial connections across all channels. As in any relationship, know the players, be clear in your message, and utilize the advantages of consistent media communication.

Still, feeling uncertain? Maybe you don’t have the capacity to get this going? Whatever the case, KM Clark Consulting is here to help. No commitments, just conversation. Contact us here!

Train Your Team Members to Live the Nonprofit Organization's Mission

Train Your Team Members to Live the Nonprofit Organization’s Mission

In the nonprofit world, people are the lifeblood of what we do. That’s great, except… it’s hard to keep people’s commitment and motivation high, and this is especially true for those that are volunteering their time.

So what do we do about that?

We have to get people to buy into our nonprofit mission. We have to get them excited about the work we do. We have to make sure that our staff and volunteers are happy about what they are doing and that it is making a real difference. How do we do all of that, though?

My best advice? Train your team members to live the nonprofit organization’s mission. Easier said than done, right? Well, let’s take a look at how our nonprofit consulting team practices what we preach.

Board Members

Your board members should be 100% committed to the nonprofit mission. While it seems obvious that board members should know the mission inside and out, this isn’t always true! Some board members might only have a surface-level understanding of the mission or issue at hand. This is why you should take some time to share the impact of your nonprofit mission through testimonials. It’s also important that all board members have a good understanding of your sustainable nonprofit’s history.

Start turning your new board members into enthusiastic fans of the mission at orientation. Stop waiting for the mission to sell itself! You should do this, even if the “training” consists only of an informal briefing accompanied by handouts. Employees need to be “sold” on the mission too, though in different ways.

Paid Staff

You’ll also want to take a look at your paid staff. How can you ensure that they understand the nonprofit mission and are truly committed to making a difference? Here are a few ways to do that:

Put it in writing! Make sure all staff members have access to the organization’s mission statement, vision statement, and values. Get them written down in one place (like on the company’s public website) so everyone sees it. Also, make sure your paid staff’s job descriptions include a reference to the nonprofit’s mission and vision.

When you conduct performance reviews with your team members, make sure to ask them how they are living the mission. This will give you a better understanding of what they do and don’t understand about the sustainable nonprofit’s mission and how you can better communicate it. If they don’t know, it’s your job to tell them!

Make training a part of your job responsibilities. That is, if you expect employees to be aware and engaged about the mission, make sure they know how to do it. Implement training programs for all employees. It doesn’t have to be long or expensive, just brief and focused on the mission. A presentation in your lunchroom or break room will work great!

Volunteers

We’ve talked about staff members and the board, but what about volunteers? How do you train them to live the mission?

Start with orientation. At orientation, provide your volunteers with an overview of the sustainable nonprofit, its mission, and send them off with a copy of the mission statement and any other important documents. Check-in with your volunteers and ask them how they’re doing at least once per month. Take these opportunities to answer any questions about the mission they might have and/or reinforce their knowledge of the mission and how their work fits into it.

As with paid staff, train your volunteers! Provide them with training opportunities and make sure they know how to live the mission.

All of these efforts will culminate in a united, enthusiastic team dedicated to making a difference and fighting the good fight!

Nonprofit Consulting and Training

Are you looking for a way to improve your organization’s board and workforce?

We know that the people who work at your nonprofit are its most valuable resource. That’s why we want to help you create the best possible board and workforce for your organization. Our nonprofit consulting agency can provide the training and tools to help ensure that everyone knows and lives the mission of your sustainable nonprofit, so they can make an even bigger impact on their communities.

We would love the opportunity to show you how KM Clark Consulting Group sets itself apart from the other nonprofit consultants out there today – our nonprofit consulting experts will provide you with all the tools and resources you need to build a great team. If you want more information about how we can help, please get in touch with us today! We look forward to hearing from you soon.

How to Write a Mutually Beneficial Partnership Agreement With a Business

How Do You Write a Mutually Beneficial Nonprofit Partnership Agreement?

We know… it can be tough to find a good business partner. Let alone one that shares the same values as your sustainable nonprofit organization.

But… the time you’ll spend doing so is definitely worth it! So where do we start? Well, the most important first step when writing a nonprofit partnership agreement is outlining what you offer and what you hope to gain from the partnership. Once you know that, you can search for the right business partner and start hammering out an agreement that will be a perfect fit!

So don’t give up! Our nonprofit consulting agency is giving you our guide on how to find the perfect partnerships and write a mutually beneficial nonprofit partnership agreement. Now… let’s get to it!

Characteristics of a Good Nonprofit Partnership Agreement

We all want to do things right the first time and get frustrated when we don’t. We know because we’re guilty of it too. So, when creating a nonprofit partnership agreement, make sure you check off the following items:

1. Working together offers mutual benefits — Both parties can reap rewards from the arrangement! Donating money, time, or resources to a good cause is always rewarding, and businesses can gain visibility and positive publicity from these collaborations. So be sure to explore all the possibilities of what your company can offer!

2. Features brand/mission alignment — It’s important for you to consider if the organizations are compatible. This means that their branding is consistent and that their missions align with each other. For example, a conservation charity would be a great partner for a company that makes camping supplies or rents kayaks and canoes to vacationers. Both organizations share a common goal of preserving the environment!

3. Includes clear communication — Communication is key in any relationship — this is especially true for partnerships! Without good communication, things can quickly fall apart. We believe it’s important to be clear on what each party expects to gain from the arrangement from the start. Maybe your organization is looking for donations, volunteer hours, or corporate sponsorship for an event. Whereas, the business owner who agrees to a partnership may want free advertising and a boost to their public image. Whatever the case may be, both parties should have a clear understanding of what’s expected!

You’ve got a good match if you’ve checked the boxes above, so now we want to make sure all expectations are clearly captured to keep things running smooth.

Define Expectations, Timelines, and Deliverables

This is where you should write down what each party’s contribution will be. At this point, the partnership agreement becomes more of an action-oriented document rather than one that defines or negotiates terms; so it needs clarity too! Make sure there aren’t any surprises in writing up these agreements and remember to clarify all promises before signing off on anything final — just like every good relationship deserves some effort from both parties involved, so does the partnership!

One of the best ways to make sure that both parties are clear on what needs to be done and when is by including a time-bound element in your agreement. This can include anything from an obligation for one party to complete a task before a specific date, all the way down to specific tasks/deadlines set during different periods throughout each day — you decide how much detail works best!

Nonprofit Consulting on Partnerships and Strategy

With so many options out there, it’s not easy to find the right nonprofit or business partner, let alone getting the perfect nonprofit partnership agreement on the first try! KM Clark Consulting Group has helped many sustainable nonprofits forge partnerships, and we’re here to help you too. We have experience with sustainable nonprofits of all shapes and sizes, so don’t hesitate to reach out if you need help finding a partner or want some nonprofit consulting on how best to market your organization. Contact us to find out what we can do for you today!

5 Ways to Improve Your Nonprofit Facebook Page

5 Ways to Improve Your Nonprofit Facebook Page

Okay, so you’ve got your nonprofit Facebook page set up. Now, what’s the best way to get more out of it?

This is a common question we ask ourselves. There are so many great ways to use a nonprofit Facebook page, but it can be tough to know where to start. Like what should you post? When should you post? You might have completed the basics like writing an overview and adding contact information, but what’s next?

Our nonprofit consulting agency wants to share with you five ways to get more value out of your nonprofit Facebook page. From reaching new partners to engaging with your community, these tips will help you make the most of your page reach.

1 – Post-Great Content

Make sure to post great content on your nonprofit Facebook page! This is the most important thing you can do in order to engage your followers and keep them updated on what’s going on. Share newsworthy stories, questions for your followers to answer, and photos/commentary on recent events. Try to stick to the original content as much as possible, rather than sharing content from other sources. That way, your followers will get more out of your page instead of someone else’s!

2 – Post Regularly

Post regularly and be interesting and relevant! Brainstorm topics if you feel like you’re running out of things to write about – it’ll make you more creative and engaging. Write everything down during brainstorming! No matter how silly you might think it is; it might just give you the creativity you need to put out something amazing. Plus, think about how much your audience will appreciate having fresh, new content to read!

3 – Ask for Support

You’re on Facebook to gain more visibility for your nonprofit and highlight its impact on the community, so why not take the opportunity to ask for help too? There are plenty of people who would be more than happy to donate their time and resources to your sustainable nonprofit. Don’t be afraid to reach out and ask for support! Make sure you highlight actions and/or steps that people can take to support your nonprofit. Use your page’s “About” section to mention donations and ask others to share your content. Also, make sure you learn about all of the great nonprofit Facebook tools out there. With a little bit of effort, you’re sure to see great results.

4 – Make Your Mission Clear

Let people know what your nonprofit organization is all about and why they should care. You’ve probably mentioned the mission and purpose in the “About Me” section of the page, but you should rewrite it in a more conversational tone for a post. Use active voice and concrete language to explain what the nonprofit organization does and why it matters. People need to know what you’re fighting for before they can get on board. You’re on Facebook, just talk to people!

5 – Have a Strategy

The most important thing you can do for your Facebook page creates an incredible marketing strategy. This document should include your nonprofit’s goals, how you’ll measure them, and who your target audience is – read more about defining your target audience here. And on a side note: you’ll know what actions are driving your results on Facebook and can cut down on your time! Without this information, it’ll be tough to make progress with your nonprofit Facebook page. So get to work on creating a killer strategy.

Nonprofit Consulting on All Aspects of Marketing

Do you want to learn how to run a sustainable nonprofit that is backed up by great social media marketing? Nonprofit consulting can help! At KM Clark Consulting Group we offer services that will guide you through all aspects of marketing, including Facebook. With our help, you can create a sustainable nonprofit that will make a difference in your community. Contact us today to learn more!